When Should You Upgrade From 2 Wheeler to 4 Wheeler

Bike to Car

“Never” says the two wheeler aficionado; “upgrade?” he roars “it is actually cage up!”

“As soon as you can afford it” opines the convenience champion

“When the family size grows beyond two” suggests the pragmatic

Thus, the decision to move from two wheels to four is largely individualistic. Some safe tips, specific to 2015 context:-

  1. When the cost of ownership of the additional wheels (not just fuel .. but also service, insurance and capital !) is affordable
  2. Provided there is safe parking available – at work and at home
  3. If your spouse announces that he/she needs to keep up with the Joneses, oops Iyers, Raos, Jains or Agarwals – 🙂
  4. When your commute distances are long and constant – generally speaking two wheels are short haul, around-the-corner usage variety. A four wheeler is handy for long rides.

With the advent of taxi-hailing apps and the business opportunity it has spawned amongst drivers’n’owners, it is now one more decision point! Read on for some other views

http://www.business-standard.com/article/pf/to-hire-or-own-a-car-115092700733_1.html

The Author, Kalyanaraman M, is the Consultant – New Products with TVS Credit Services

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Car Buying Tips

6july blog

Whether it’s your first car or your tenth, you can never benefit enough from advice to help make your purchase decisions. For the simple common man, buying a car is a rational choice to get from one place to the next, and to fit the family within safely and comfortably, and in many instances, at a low cost. Investing in a car is not a linear decision – it involves a fairly considerable thinking process that centres around the core goal of fulfilling the basic needs and expectations from owning a car. Here are a couple of things you should keep in mind when you’re buying a car.

Understand the kinds of cars there are
Cars come in different kinds, sizes and models to suit your utility needs. To start with, get your basics right. A convertible is good on the aesthetics, but not so much on the functionality, unless you have small children whose safety is better guaranteed with two doors rather than four. A sedan is a good idea if you have a small family with young children, so your kids can climb into the vehicle with ease. Hatchbacks come with a comfortable space in the seating space of the car, with the comfort of a wagon like structure at the back – which works great if you’re a larger family and like to go on long trips with your luggage in tow. Station wagons and mini vans work if you’re plying a large family around, or a large amount of cargo – it isn’t exactly the kind of vehicle a family usually goes in for.

Safety is as safety does
The right car size really depends on your own needs. While there is a common belief that larger vehicles are safer than smaller ones, it is really a misconception to say that. The key point here is to ensure that safety is a valuable factor in your purchase decision. You need to understand the engineering of the vehicle, its ability to respond to crashes and accidents, and the sturdiness of the body to help choose a durable car for your every need.

Size wise
If you are a small family, and would like to keep your savings in order at first, a small car is not a bad idea at all. Go in for a big car when you know that your needs and affordability have risen in a suitable proportion. You also need to consider parking-related concerns wherever your vehicle goes: at home, at work, outside school and wherever it is that you will be running errands to. If your vehicle is likely to find a smaller parking spot, you’d be wiser indulging in a smaller vehicle. One point to remember is that a car maybe small in structure, but on the inside, it needn’t be. You have plenty of cars in the market that come with spacious interiors packed within a light and small frame of a vehicle.

Take your surroundings into consideration
There are a lot of factors around where you live that can account for the kind of vehicle you should invest in. In a place that is hilly, or has rugged terrain, you’ll be doing a wise thing in investing in a heavier vehicle that has the capacity to handle rugged terrain. For a more urban lifestyle, a lighter vehicle works well. If you are in a place that is seasonal, invest in a car that will help you adapt to each season – such as through winter tires for snowy and wet terrain, skid free tyres for rainy terrain and the like.

Budgetary considerations
Owning and maintaining a car is not child’s play, and can be demanding in terms of the amount of money one is expected to plough into the car on a near-daily basis. To this end, low maintenance and diesel cars work like a charm if you know that you’re on a shoestring budget or thereabouts. But if you can afford to set aside a decent amount of money each month for your transportation needs, indulging in a middle-to-high maintenance car is a viable option.